Summits Yellow

Facebook tackles brand safety with ban on monetisation of hate, violence, drugs, porn

Tyrone Stewart

FacebookFacebook has made moves to make sure inappropriate content, such as hate, violence, pornography, and drugs, isn’t rewarded on its social network and to ensure brand safety.

The internet giant has introduced a set of monetisation eligibility standards that mean only legitimate creators and publishers can benefit from advertising on their content.

“We want to support a diverse range of creators and publishers, which is why we’ve introduced a range of monetisation options, including Branded Content and Instant Articles,” said Nick Grudin, VP of media partnerships, in a blog post. “More recently, we’ve been testing Ad Breaks with a group of publishers, and we’re working on opening it up more broadly.

“As we continue to expand our monetisation offerings, it’s important that we provide clear guidelines around what can and cannot be monetised on our platform. Many of these experiences are made possible through ads from over 5m advertisers on Facebook, and they need to feel confident and in control over where their ads appear.”

Creators and publishers must now be who they say they are, and have had their profile or page for at least one month. Furthermore, features like ad breaks on videos require a sufficient follower base to benefit from.

Content posted must now also follow strict guidelines surrounding what advertisers, and Facebook users in general, may find sensitive. The types of content listed as not being eligible for monetisation includes the misappropriation of children’s characters, content that focuses on tragedies and conflict, content featuring debated social issues, violent content, adult content, anything published that features prohibited activity, explicit content, drugs or alcohol use, and inappropriate language.

Initially, these guidelines will only apply to videos on Facebook, but will eventually extend to Instant Articles. This fact is very important, as the guidelines could have a bearing on the types of content created for Facebook’s Watch video service.