Summits Yellow

More than a third of Brits will exercise their right to be forgotten when GDPR arrives

Tyrone Stewart

GDPR data centre34 per cent of UK adults plan to use their right to be forgotten once the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) kicks in on 25 May, according to a survey of 1,000 Brits carried out by media agency The7stars.

The research also found that only 19 per cent of respondents are confident that their data is used in the best way by business, while 58 per cent will use GDPR to question how much data these businesses have on them.

Perhaps more worryingly, only 27 per cent of respondents said they have an understanding of what GDPR is how it affects them. This fact was further highlighted by 75 per cent stating that they believe the government should make it clear what GDPR is before it is implemented.

Despite the lack of knowledge about GDPR, 58 per cent of respondents think the regulation is a positive step, and 32 per cent said thy would trust brands more with their data as a result of its implementation.

“With ‘Implementation Day’ now less than 100 days away, time is running out fast for brands, advertisers and marketers to get their data ducks in a row,” said Frances Revel, associate director for insight at The7stars.” Given the importance of data to business operations, the fact that over a third of people are looking to exercise their right to be forgotten represents a real threat that cannot be ignored.

“However, there is still time for Government and brands to come together to tackle consumer concerns around data protection and privacy head on, and the brands who get this right stand to gain the most.”