MASTERCLASSING

Pinterest bans weight loss ads

Gabby Fernie

Pinterest has today announced an updated weight loss ad policy that prohibits all ads with weight loss language and imagery.

New research by the platform reveals that 41 per cent of Brits admit to feeling pressure to get ‘Summer body ready’ and a further third (28 per cent) of those surveyed shared that popular culture’s portrayal of bodies makes them feel self-conscious.

The updated policy prohibits not only weight loss language and imagary but testimonials of weight loss products, referencing of Body Mass Index (BMI) or similar indexes, any products that claim weight loss through something worn or applied to the skin, and language or imagery that idealizes or denigrates certain body types. 

This is in addition to ad content that is already barred from Pinterest, including weight loss procedures like liposuction or fat burning, and claims regarding unrealistic cosmetic results. 

Pinterest will also be blocking all searches for keywords on the platform related to eating disorders or terms suggesting a restrictive mindset and offers a variety of emotional well-being activities developed by emotional health experts. 

Users can simply search for “#pinterestwellbeing” to explore gratitude and self-compassion exercises, along with other interactive practices that can help improve their mood.

“As Pinterest and our Pinner base continues to grow, we remain focused on maintaining a safe, positive, inspiring and relevant Pinner experience,” said Head of Policy at Pinterest, Sarah Bromma. “People of all ages are facing challenges related to body image and mental health, particularly as we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic and kick-off the summer season. We believe updating our ad policy globally to prohibit all ads with weight loss language and imagery is an important step in prioritizing the mental health and well-being of our Pinners and fostering a place on the internet where they can be themselves, embrace their bodies regardless of shape or size, and feel comfortable with who they are.”